Extreme Stamina Training – Part 3

The following article is Part 3 of the Extreme Stamina Training series. These articles were written by Big Al, of MaleEnhancementCoach.com.

As the lead trainer over at meCoach, Big Al has extensive experience helping men reach their male enhancement goals, including improving stamina. He can help you reach your male enhancement goals too!

If you missed Part 1, check it out here — Extreme Stamina Training – Part 1

If you missed Part 2, check it out here — Extreme Stamina Training – Part 2

The Towel Raise:

The towel raise is a great exercise for developing penile strength and rock hard erections. It’s essentially a weighted kegel, so don’t perform this movement until you’ve fully mastered the kegel.

With an erection, place a towel over the end of your penis. Try to lift your towel-covered penis by squeezing the PC muscle (as in kegels.) Start with 20 reps and work up to 100 reps 5 times a week. As time goes by, you can add weight by using larger towels, or even by wetting the towel. An advanced technique for Towel Raises would be to hold the towel in the up position for 10 to 20 seconds at a time.

You should attempt to work up to 5 to 10 of these sustained

Super Kegels:

The Super Kegel is performed the same way as the regular kegel, except you try to go for holding endurance instead of repetition quantity. Try to work up to 5- 100 second holds.

Emotional/Mental Conditioning

Performance anxiety is perhaps the biggest contributor to issues with stamina- especially among younger men. A close second would be negative conditioning caused by negative masturbation habits (usually in conjunction with pornography addiction). Even if anxiety isn’t present, if enough negative conditioning has set in it can still dull the desired sexual response.

The standard stamina regimen outlined earlier can be usually be used with success for this type of issue, but it the problem is severe one should expect to devote some time (usually several weeks) to reconditioning to perform the exercises adequately. It’s VITAL this transition period be stuck with, and the best mindset during this period is an objective one since the exercise form may not be up to standard. Accepting this temporary situation will greatly accelerate the process.

The visualization portion of this training is perhaps the most important aspect. This is NOT a reference to sexual fantasizing, but to projecting the type of emotions you wish to have during actual sexual encounters. You’ll want to project a feeling of utmost confidence and being completely unencumbered. That way, you can focus on all of the sensations of the exercise. By doing this, when you do have live sexual encounters your emotions will be “trained”, and the stimulus of a live environment will help you enjoy the experience even more.

This initial attempting to clear the mind to create a blank slate for the reconditioning will be necessary. There’s a particular type of issue found in those who attempt to shortcut the process of mastering the emotional vulnerabilities which can lead to Erectile Dysfunction. This is called the “Dark Side” of male enhancement, and many inadvertently use this process to overcome (to some degree) their performance anxieties. Essentially, it involves a deliberate decoupling of emotion and sexual contact- often accompanied with the mindset of obtaining sexual partners for “practice”. In extreme cases, sexual partners are viewed merely as sex objects used to bolster the ego.

The downside of the above practice becomes evident when the trainer decides one day to allow themselves to become emotionally vulnerable (e.g.- they “fall in love”). Often enough, the repressed issues find themselves at the forefront again- often with a vengeance.

Learning to first accept you’ll need retraining then taking a mature and objective approach to it will offer you the best opportunity towards rebuilding your stamina and sexual confidence.

References:

Premature Ejaculation:

Althof, S. E. (2007). Treatment of rapid ejaculation: Psychotherapy, pharmacotherapy, and combined therapy (pp. 212240). In S. R. Leiblum (Ed.), Principles and practice of sex therapy (4th ed.). NY: Guilford.

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